Tag Archives: Robin Parry

Articles on reading Old Testament law

Reading the Law
J. G. McConville and Karl Möller (eds), Reading the Law: Studies in Honour of Gordon J. Wenham (Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies, 461; New York: T & T Clark International, 2007)

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This book is a Festschrift for Prof. Gordon Wenham. Its chosen theme is intended to reflect his central interests in his long career of writing on the Old Testament, in which he has exemplified the highest standards of scholarship, but also written for practitioners of biblical interpretation. The topic of ‘reading the law’ has three aspects which will be treated by the various contributions, namely: 1. Reading the Pentateuch: Pentateuchal criticism, narrative readings, rhetorical-critical readings; 2. Reading the Law: the law codes in historical and/or literary context, anthropological readings, the law in relation to prophets, wisdom, worship; 3. Reading the Bible ethically: e.g. ethics of marriage, war.

… a worthy set of essays collected in honor of a very worthy scholar.

Joe M. Sprinkle, Stone-Campbell Journal

Contents

Part I: Reading Pentateuchal Law

  • Being a Man in the Book of the Covenant
    David J. A. Clines
  • ‘Fellow Citizens’: Israel and Humanity in Leviticus
    J. G. McConville
  • Commanding an Impossibility? Reflections on the Golden Rule in Leviticus 19:18b
    Nobuyoshi Kiuchi
  • The Case for the Pre-Exilic and Exilic Provenance of the Books of Exodus, Leviticus and Numbers
    Jacob Milgrom

Part II: Reading the Law in the Prophets

  • The Meaning of תורה in Isaiah 1–39
    Ronald E. Clements
  • Torah in the Minor Prophets
    Thomas Renz
  • The Trial of Jeremiah
    Raymond Westbrook

Part III: Reading the Law in the Writings

  • Reading, Singing and Praying the Law: An Exploration of the Performative, Self-Involving, Commissive Language of Psalm 101
    Karl Möller
  • The Ethics of Lament: Lamentations 1 as a Case Study
    Robin Parry
  • The Torah and History in Presentations of Restoration in Ezra–Nehemiah
    H. G. M. Williamson

Part IV: Reading the Law for Theology

  • The Theology of Place in Genesis 1–3
    Craig G. Bartholomew
  • The Regal Dimension of the תולדות־יעקב: Recovering the Literary Context of Genesis 37–50
    T. Desmond Alexander
  • On Learning Spiritual Discipline: A Reading of Exodus 16
    R. W. L. Moberly
  • The Week That Made the World: Reflections on the First Pages of the Bible
    Robert P. Gordon

Part V: Reading the Law and History

  • Going Down to Sheol: A Place Name and Its West Semitic Background
    Richard S. Hess
  • The Tablets in the Ark
    Alan Millard
  • Memory, Witness and Genocide in the Book of Joshua
    Pekka Pitkänen
  • Towards a Communicative Theology of the Old Testament
    J. W. Rogerson

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A collection of articles on biblical theology

Out of EgyptOut of Egypt

Craig Bartholomew, Mary Healy, Karl Möller and Robin Parry (eds), Out of Egypt: Biblical Theology and Biblical Interpretation (Scripture & Hermeneutics Series, 5; Carlisle: Paternoster Press; Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2004)

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The Christian church confesses Scripture to be the authoritative Word of God, and thereby commits itself to seeking the inner unity of the Bible as it is focussed in the one gospel of Jesus Christ, which the church declares to the world. Biblical theology is the name for the articulation of that inner unity of the Bible, and this volume rows vigorously against the currents in mainline biblical studies as it seeks to set the table for a renewed feast of biblical theology in biblical interpretation.

Craig Bartholomew

Out of Egypt is the fifth volume from the Scripture and Hermeneutics Seminar. This annual gathering of Christian scholars from various disciplines was established in 1998 and aims to reassess the discipline of biblical studies from the foundations up and forge creative new ways for reopening the Bible in our cultures.

In modernity biblical studies has stressed the diversity of Scripture to such an extent that any expression of its overarching unity is regarded with scepticism. The demise of the Biblical Theology Movement in 1961 played into this tendency, and since then biblical theology has not recovered its place as a major element in biblical interpretation. However, any approach to the Bible as Christian Scripture must recognise the need to articulate the inner unity of the Bible and hence of biblical theology. Furthermore, situated as we are in ‘post-modernity’ we are better able to see how untimely the demise of biblical theology is. This volume assesses the current state of biblical theology and sets forth in a smorgasbord of creative ways fresh directions for doing biblical interpretation.

This volume on biblical theology jumps into the fray and poses the right kind of questions. It does not offer a single way forward. Several of the essays are quite fresh and provocative, breaking new ground (Bray, Reno); others set out the issues with clarity and grace (Bartholomew); others offer programmatic analysis (Webster, Bauckham); others offer a fresh angle of view (Chapman, Martin). The success of this series is in facing the challenge of disarray in biblical studies head-on and then modelling a variety of approaches to stimulate our reflection.

Christopher Seitz, Professor of Old Testament and Theological Studies, St Andrews University, UK

Ranging widely across the latest theory and up-to-date praxis of biblical theology, this volume makes a significant contribution to the gathering renewal of that discipline on both sides of the Atlantic. With an ecumenical, star-studded team of experts in the Old and New Testaments as well as in Patristics and Christian doctrine, Out of Egypt is more than a sum of its parts: from various theoretical and practical perspectives, it demonstrates both the pedigree and the intellectual vitality of biblical theology. In so doing, this book gives continued hope for an exodus of Christian biblical interpretation from its long slavery to diverse late-modern taskmasters of historicist and ideologically revisionist deconstruction.

Markus Bockmuehl, Reader in New Testament Studies, University of Cambridge, UK

Biblical theology attempts to explore the theological coherence of the canonical witnesses; no serious Christian theology can overlook this issue. The essays in the present volume illustrate the complexity and richness of the conversation that results from attentive consideration of the question. In a time when some voices are calling for a moratorium on biblical theology, or pronouncing its concerns obsolete, this collection of meaty essays demonstrates the continuing vitality and necessity of the enterprise.

Richard B. Hays, George Washington Ivey Professor of New Testament, The Divinity School, Duke University, USA

Contents

Biblical Theology and Biblical Interpretation: Introduction
Craig G. Bartholomew

  1. The Church Fathers and Biblical Theology
    Gerald Bray
  2. The Nature and Genre of Biblical Theology: Some Reflections in the Light of Charles H. H. Scobie’s ‘Prolegomena to a Biblical Theology’
    Karl Möller
  3. Some Directions in Catholic Biblical Theology
    Francis Martin
  4. The Theology of the Old Testament by Marco Nobile: A Contribution to Jewish–Christian Relations
    Nuria Calduch-Benages
  5. Mission as a Matrix for Hermeneutics and Biblical Theology
    Christopher J. H. Wright
  6. Story and Biblical Theology
    Craig G. Bartholomew and Mike W. Goheen
  7. The Problem of ‘Biblical Theology’
    James D. G. Dunn
  8. Biblical Theology and the Problem of Monotheism
    Richard Bauckham
  9. The Unity of Humankind as a Theme in Biblical Theology
    Stephen C. Barton
  10. Zechariah 14 and Biblical Theology: Patristic and Contemporary Case Studies
    Al Wolters
  11. Paul and Salvation History in Romans 9:30–10:4
    William J. Dumbrell
  12. Hebrews and Biblical Theology
    Andrew T. Lincoln
  13. Systematic – In What Sense?
    Trevor Hart
  14. Biblical Theology and the Clarity of Scripture
    John Webster
  15. Biblical Theology and Theological Exegesis
    R. R. Reno
  16. Imaginative Reading of Scripture and Theological Interpretation
    Stephen B. Chapman
  17. Biblical Theology and Preaching
    Charles H. H. Scobie

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